300 for 300 + Portraits from Week 23

We’re excited to share with you the twenty-third week of portraits recently published on Nola.com, including Becate Batiste, Suzanne Mestayer, Paul McIllhenny, Alvin Batiste, Pere Antoine, and Millie Charles.

Becate Batiste, by D. Lammie-Hanson

Becate Batiste, by D. Lammie-Hanson

“Even at the parades with floats and costumes that cost millions, why, if the folks heard the sign of the Indians — Ungai-ha! Ungai-ha! — that big parade wouldn’t have anybody there. The crowd would flock to see the Indians.” — Jazz pioneer (and one time Mardi Gras Indian spy boy) Jelly Roll Morton, in 1938 (excerpt from Nola.com)

Discover more about D. Lammie-Hanson and her creative process here
Read the full story about Becate Batiste on Nola.com

Suzanne Mestayer, by Alexandra Kilburn

Suzanne Mestayer, by Alexandra Kilburn

“The more women at the top, the more it increases the believability of younger women that they can go up that ladder. — Suzanne Mestayer, in a video interview with IR Magazine (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Alexandra Kilburn and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Suzanne Mestayer on Nola.com

Paul McIllhenny, by Sean Randall

Paul McIllhenny, by Sean Randall

“Come hell or high water, we will have Mardi Gras. It’s in the soul and the fabric and the fiber of the city and the people. People will celebrate in one form or another. If someone said he’s going to pull a wagon with beads, that’s a form of Mardi Gras.” — Paul McIlhenny, in 2006, before riding as the first post-Katrina Rex (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Sean Randall and his creative process here 
Read the full story about Paul McIllhenny on Nola.com

Alvin Batiste, by Jeff Morgan

Alvin Batiste, by Jeff Morgan

“He was a perpetual student and a perpetual educator. He would practice every morning when he woke up. He was still searching, still looking for something new in the music. And when he found it, he passed it on.” — drummer and Batiste student Herlin Riley, in 2007 (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Jeff Morgan and his creative process here 
Read the full story about Alvin Batiste on Nola.com 

Pere Antoine, by Alexandra Kilburn

Pere Antoine, by Alexandra Kilburn

“Among the Catholic clergy, Father Antoine, a Capuchin, stands out and highly deserves the esteem in which he is held by the Catholics as well as by the Protestants. He is a true father of the sick, the helpless and the forsaken.” — author and traveler Charles Sidons, in 1827, after visiting New Orleans (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Alexandra Kilburn and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Pere Antoine on Nola.com

Millie Charles, by Sean Randall

Millie Charles, by Sean Randall

“She always challenged us to do more. If you were mediocre, that wasn’t enough when you weren’t doing as much as you could do. She could push. It made all the difference in the world because she wanted to make sure we had the capacity to keep moving on.” — Ronald McClain, president and CEO, Family Service of Greater New Orleans (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Sean Randall and his creative process here 
Read the full story about Millie Charles on Nola.com 

Where Y’Art is the proud partner of Nola Media Group, the producers of Nola.com / The Times-Picayune for its 300 for 300 project, marking the tricentennial of New Orleans, running through 2018 and highlighting 300 people who have made New Orleans, New Orleans.