300 for 300 + Portraits from Week 27

We’re excited to share with you the twenty-seventh week of portraits recently published on Nola.com, including Irma Thomas, Joe Yenni, Sandra Dartus, Frances Joseph-Gaudet, Etienne de Bore, and Willie Mae Seaton.

Irma Thomas, by Jeff Morgan

Irma Thomas, by Jeff Morgan

“Her voice … just envelops you. It’s like putting a warm blanket on when you hear Irma sing.” — Scott Billington, Thomas’ longtime producer, in a 2018 NPR interview (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Jeff Morgan and his creative process here 
Read the full story about Irma Thomas on Nola.com

Joe Yenni, by Michael McManus

Joe Yenni, by Michael McManus

“He was the only person in the history of the parish who could say, ‘Trust me,’ and people would respond.” — Market research Allen Rosenweig, talking about Joe Yenni in 1987 (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Michael McManus and his creative process here 
Read the full story about Joe Yenni on Nola.com

Sandra Dartus, by Sean Randall

Sandra Dartus, by Sean Randall

“I’m one of those people who really like their job. I live in a city I’m proud of, and in the Quarter, where you may not know everyone by name, but you know the faces and they know yours. Everybody says, ‘Hello, how you doin’, you OK?,’ and I never fail to walk down the street and notice something new; this city is always an experience. But you know what the truly neat, really great thing is about New Orleans? Everybody wants to be here!” — Sandra Dartus, in a 1999 interview with The Times-Picayune. (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Sean Randall and his creative process here 
Read the full story about Sandra Dartus on Nola.com

Frances Joseph-Gaudet, by Queen Hope Parker

Frances Joseph-Gaudet, by Queen Hope Parker

“There is a chronic class of prisoners, white and colored, who are out one week and in the next. Some deem this class hopeless, but I believe there is some good in all, and as long as there is life there is hope.” — Frances Joseph-Gaudet, in her 1913 autobiography “He Leadeth Me” (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Queen Hope Parker and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Frances Joseph-Gaudet on Nola.com 

Etienne de Bore, by Maddie Stratton

Etienne de Bore, by Maddie Stratton

“Other planters followed the example of M. de Bore, and the cane will doubtless be very soon cultivated in every part of this territory where the climate permits. The facility with which sugar planters amass wealth is almost incredible.” — Louisiana Gov. C.C. Claiborne, in an 1806 letter to Thomas Jefferson (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Maddie Stratton and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Etienne de Bore on Nola.com

Willie Mae Seaton, by Jessica Strahan

Willie Mae Seaton, by Jessica Strahan

“This was basket-fried, deep-fried chicken, and it was as good as anything I’ve ever eaten. And it was that crust. It was that fusion of skin and crust, the moment which they became one. And when you bit into it, there was a burst of juice, there was a subtle heat. It was beautiful.” — Southern Foodways Alliance Director John T. Edge, on his first taste of fried chicken from Willie Mae’s Scotch House (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Jessica Strahan and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Willie Mae Seaton on Nola.com 

Where Y’Art is the proud partner of Nola Media Group, the producers of Nola.com / The Times-Picayune for its 300 for 300 project, marking the tricentennial of New Orleans, running through 2018 and highlighting 300 people who have made New Orleans, New Orleans.