300 for 300 + Portraits from Week 38

We’re excited to share with you the thirty-eighth week of portraits recently published on Nola.com, including Elizabeth Magnus Cohen, Kurt Weigle, Sylvanie Williams, Linetta Gilbert, Hilda Phelps Hammond, and Sharon Litwin.

Elizabeth Magnus Cohen, by Queen Hope Parker

Elizabeth Magnus Cohen, by Queen Hope Parker

“All the doctors sent me cases. I can’t count all the babies I brought — in those days, women had 15 or 16 children as a matter of course. … I never knew what it was to have a whole night’s rest during 30 years. We didn’t have telephones, but messages came at all hours to my house in Baronne Street.” — Dr. Elizabeth Magnus Cohen, in a 1920 interview with The Times-Picayune (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Queen Hope Parker and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Elizabeth Magnus Cohen on Nola.com

Portrait of Kurt Weigle, by D. Lammie-Hanson

Portrait of Kurt Weigle, by D. Lammie-Hanson

“We helped to create a better investment environment downtown, through cleaning, public safety and the promotion of downtown to create a place where people want to be.” — Kurt Weigle in a 2015 interview with NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about D. Lammie-Hanson and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Kurt Weigle on Nola.com 

A portrait of Sylvanie Williams, by Maddie Stratton

A portrait of Sylvanie Williams, by Maddie Stratton

“Flowers, in their beauty and sweetness, may represent the womanhood of the world. Some flowers are fragile and delicate, some strong and hardy. Some are carefully guarded and cherished, others are roughly treated and trodden underfoot. These last are the colored women. The colored woman has a crown of thorns continually pressed upon her brow. Yet she is advancing, and sometimes you find her further on than you would have expected.” — Sylvanie Williams, addressing Susan B. Anthony in New Orleans in April 1903, as reported by The Woman’s Journal (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Maddie Stratton and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Sylvanie Williams on Nola.com

Linetta Gilbert, by Jessica Strahan

Linetta Gilbert, by Jessica Strahan

“She talked about how philanthropy is re-tooling — that issues around social justice are again up for conversation and that we have more assets and resources than in the past… She told us to always look at an issue from the standpoint of the local level, stretch yourself, recognize that our jobs are to be talent scouts (and to) err on the side of the person who has a good idea.” — Jennifer Shanks, writing about Linetta Gilbert on www.epip.org, the website of Emerging Practitioners in Philanthropy (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Jessica Strahan and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Linetta Gilbert on Nola.com

Hilda Phelps Hammond, by Maddie Stratton

A portrait of Hilda Phelps Hammond, by Maddie Stratton

“This is a national, not a state matter. It is a fight for decency in government and politics. … When a man is so powerful that he can stop investigations of fraud by the United States Senate, that man is a menace to the whole United States.” — Hilda Phelps Hammond, referring to then-Sen. Huey P. Long (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Maddie Stratton and his creative process here 
Read the full story about Hilda Phelps Hammond on Nola.com 

Sharon Litwin, by Saegan Swanson

Sharon Litwin, by Saegan Swanson

“The arts, the music, the food — everything about New Orleans was what Sharon loved, and that was the essence of her life. She just had a knack for taking a spin on something and making it great if it had something to do with the culture of this city.” — Jackie Sullivan, a longtime friend of Sharon Litwin (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Saegan Swanson and his creative process here 
Read the full story about Sharon Litwin on Nola.com 

Where Y’Art is the proud partner of Nola Media Group, the producers of Nola.com / The Times-Picayune for its 300 for 300 project, marking the tricentennial of New Orleans, running through 2018 and highlighting 300 people who have made New Orleans, New Orleans.