300 for 300 + Portraits from Week Sixteen

We’re excited to share with you the sixteenth week of portraits recently published on Nola.com, including Austin Leslie, Lolis Edward Elie, A. Baldwin Wood, Adrien de Pauger, Sister Mary Frances Buttell, and John Gendusa.

Austin Leslie, by Alexandra Kilburn

Austin Leslie, by Alexandra Kilburn

“It was just good old Creole food, good old-time New Orleans food. And he was good, damn good. You couldn’t fry a chicken better than Austin. You couldn’t stuff a pepper better than Austin Leslie.” — Leah Chase, in 2005 (excerpt from Nola.com)

Discover more about Alexandra Kilburn and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Austin Leslie on Nola.com

Lolis Edward Elie, by Sean Randall

Lolis Edward Elie, by Sean Randall

“I think we made a great deal of progress, but we’re still stuck with the same problems now that we had then. The worst problem we have is there’s no meaningful education, and it’s a lot of hostility toward youngsters. I mean, there are no playground facilities in this whole community. No basketball goals in Louis Armstrong park. That fence is there to keep the little Louis Armstrongs out. And it’s an insult.” — Lolis Edward Elie in 2013 (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Sean Randall and his creative process here 
Read the full story about Lolis Edward Elie on Nola.com

A. Baldwin Wood, by D. Lammie-Hanson

A. Baldwin Wood, by D. Lammie-Hanson

“In its loss, the community can at least feel grateful for the long span of years over which this champion of efficient and honest public service was allowed to carry on. His was a life of achievement and usefulness.” — The Times-Picayune, on the death of A. Baldwin Wood (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about D. Lammie-Hanson and her creative process here 
Read the full story about A. Baldwin Wood on Nola.com

Adrien de Pauger, by Michael McManus

Adrien de Pauger, by Michael McManus

If I had not taken upon myself all that one can take to surmount all the ill will … the principal seat would have remained at Biloxi.” — Adrien de Pauger (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Michael McManus and his creative process here
Read the full story about Adrien de Pauger on Nola.com 

Sister Mary Frances Buttell, by Maddie Stratton

Sister Mary Frances Buttell, by Maddie Stratton

“Sister Mary Frances Buttell … impacted the city, the church, society and culture of New Orleans as she moved the dream of availability of Catholic higher education for local African-Americans to the vibrant reality of Xavier University of Louisiana.” — Raymond Verret, Xavier University president (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Maddie Stratton and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Sister Mary Frances Buttell on Nola.com

John Gendusa, by Connie Kittok

John Gendusa, by Connie Kittok

“There were bakeries on every corner in Sicily, so it was just one of those things that always caught your eye, and I guess maybe lit a fuse, and he realized that was something he wanted to do.” — Jason Gendusa, owner of John Gendusa Bakery, talking about his grandfather in 2015 (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Connie Kittok and her creative process here 
Read the full story about John Gendusa on Nola.com 

Where Y’Art is the proud partner of Nola Media Group, the producers of Nola.com / The Times-Picayune for its 300 for 300 project, marking the tricentennial of New Orleans, running through 2018 and highlighting 300 people who have made New Orleans, New Orleans.