300 for 300 + Portraits from Week Two

We’re excited to share with you the second week of portraits recently published on Nola.com, including Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne Sieur de Bienville, Al Copeland, Andrew Jackson, General Russel Honore, Avery Alexander and Drew Brees. 

A portrait of Jean – Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville, by Maddie Stratton

A portrait of Jean – Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville, by Maddie Stratton

“We are working at New Orleans with as much zeal as the shortage of working men will allow. I have myself conveyed over the spot to select the place where it will be best to locate the settlement. … All the ground of the site, except the borders, which are drowned by floods, are very good and everything will grow there.” — Bienville, writing in a June 1718 entry in his diary (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Maddie and her creative process here 
Read the full story about Bienville on Nola.com

Al Copeland Cajun Sparkle!, by Gabriel Flores

“What Al Copeland is, is what everybody wants to be. He’s young, he’s good-looking, he’s flamboyant, he’s got a lot of power and he’s extremely rich. He’s the American dream. People who don’t like him, they can’t accept that he is what they want to be.” — Copeland confidante Andrew Jaeger, in a 1985 interview with The Times-Picayune
(excerpt from Nola.com)  

Discover more about Gabriel and his creative process here
Read the full story about Al Copeland Cajun Sparkle! on Nola.com

Andrew Jackson, by Connie Kittok

Andrew Jackson, by Connie Kittok

“Before he was the people’s president, he was America’s military hero. His victory over the British at the Battle of New Orleans was judged the greatest triumph of American arms since the Revolutionary War. Jackson was hailed as the second General Washington. Where Washington had won American independence from Britain at Yorktown, Jackson confirmed independence at New Orleans.” – H.W. Brands, author of “Andrew Jackson” (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Connie and her creative process here
Read the full story about Andrew Jackson on Nola.com

General Russel Honoré, by Jeff Morgan

General Russel Honoré, by Jeff Morgan

“It’s best to tell the truth, because if you don’t, it will come back and have some negative effects on you. So I think those are key in operating in a crisis with people around you that are tired, people who sometime don’t know where their families are, as was the case of Katrina. I think if we do that more in government and in our communities, we would get a lot more done.”  — Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré, speaking to NPR in August 2007 (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Jeff and his creative process here
Read the full story about General Russel Honoré on Nola.com

Rev. Avery Alexander, by D. Lammie Hanson

Rev. Avery Alexander, by D. Lammie Hanson

Two photos, taken 30 years apart, illustrate the Rev. Avery Alexander’s indefatigable fight against racism and injustice. A 1963 photo, when he was 53, shows police dragging him out of New Orleans City Hall by his ankles after he’d protested City Hall’s segregated cafeteria. A 1993 photo shows an almost 83-year-old state representative protesting the Liberty Place monument as police officer has a forearm across Alexander’s throat. New Orleans didn’t desegregate its facilities or even remove racist monuments just because it was the right thing to do. The changes were prompted by people such as Alexander who was always willing to put his body on the line and confront wrongs head-on. (excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Lammie and her creative process here
Read the full story about Rev. Avery Alexander on Nola.com

Drew Brees, by Sean Randall

Drew Brees, by Sean Randall

It all came down to timing. Drew Brees was coming off a major shoulder injury and needed a city to believe in him. New Orleans was on its knees after Hurricane Katrina and needed a champion. By signing a contract with the Saints in 2006, Brees showed a world still wondering whether New Orleans was worth saving that he believed, and in turn, he helped New Orleanians believe in ourselves again.(excerpt from Nola.com) 

Discover more about Sean and his creative process here
Read the full story about Drew Brees on Nola.com

Where Y’Art is the proud partner of Nola Media Group, the producers of Nola.com / The Times-Picayune for its 300 for 300 project, marking the tricentennial of New Orleans, running through 2018 and highlighting 300 people who have made New Orleans, New Orleans.